Harvard Research Confirms What We've Been Saying for Months

There is not evidentiary correlation between cases and vaccination rates

I have no idea how this paper made it past the censors but there it is! This was published a month ago but didn’t receive much fanfare and now we know why—it confirms what we’ve been saying for months now: the vaccines have not stopped and likely will not stop the pandemic.

Back in July we tweeted that the CDC data mapping vax rates to COVID-19 case rates shows ZERO impact of the former on the latter:

We’ve written in these pages multiple times about the same phenomenon. Yesterday, Dr. Jay Bhattacharya of Stanford tweeted:

“There is a lot to learn from this graph, but most obviously, the COVID vax does not stop infection. The vax provides a private benefit (protection vs. severe disease), but limited public benefit (protection vs. disease spread). So what is the argument for mandates?”

Now this Harvard research notes:

At the country-level, there appears to be no discernable relationship between percentage of population fully vaccinated and new COVID-19 cases in the last 7 days (Fig. 1). In fact, the trend line suggests a marginally positive association such that countries with higher percentage of population fully vaccinated have higher COVID-19 cases per 1 million people.

When they got down to the U.S. county level the relation was even less discernible:

They conclude:

The sole reliance on vaccination as a primary strategy to mitigate COVID-19 and its adverse consequences needs to be re-examined, especially considering  the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant and the likelihood of future variants

Feel some vindication folks. We were right.